Nonsubsidised LPG in Delhi to get cheaper by Rs 6250cylinder

first_imgNew Delhi: The price of Non-Subsidised LPG in Delhi will decrease by Rs 62.50/14.2 kg cylinder with effect from August 1 based on LPG prices in international market and US$-Rupee exchange rate. Accordingly, the upfront cash payment by the consumers of domestic LPG will also reduce by Rs 62.50/cylinder. Domestic LPG consumers will now be required to make upfront cash payment of Rs 574.50/- only per 14.2 kg cylinder in August, 2019 in place of Rs 637.00/- per cylinder for July, 2019. It may be noted that the price of Non-Subsidised LPG was reduced by Rs 100.50/cylinder earlier in July 2019 also. Considering this, the price of Non-Subsidised LPG cylinder has come down by Rs 163.00/cylinder cumulatively in two months.last_img read more

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Kothari is Indias new No 1 cueist

first_imgNew Delhi: Reigning WBL World Billiards champion Sourav Kothari came up with a scintillating performance in Bangalore to emerge India’s No. 1 player in the national men’s billiards rankings.Kothari won both national selection championships and crafted a scintillating 400 unfinished break to become the country’s new top ranked cueist. On his way to No. 1 ranking, Kothari did the unthinkable by crafting a flawless 400 unfinished break as he played with absolute deft touch amassing more than 350 points of the break at the top of the table in his last league encounter against B Bhaskar of Karnataka.The first selection tournament was played in the 150 up best of 5 format, while the second was played on the 400 up format. By virtue of winning both the national selection tournaments, Kothari will now represent India as the top player from the country in the forthcoming World Billiards Championships, to be held in Myanmar (short format) in September and Melbourne (long format) in November.last_img read more

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India to import more from US

first_imgBiarritz/London: Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Monday informed President Donald Trump that India plans to further step up imports, including oil, from the US and that $4 billion worth of imports were already “in the pipeline”, as the two countries sought to overcome their differences on tariffs and market access. The Modi-Trump meeting assumes significance in the wake of the strain that has popped up in the bilateral relationship on a host of trade and economic issues. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalMeeting on the sidelines of the G7 Summit in the French city of Biarritz, where India was a special invitee, Modi and Trump agreed that preferably before the Prime Minister visits US next month, there will be an interaction between their trade ministers at which “the whole range of trade issues will be discussed,” Foreign Secretary Vijay Gokhale said. Briefing on the 40-minute meeting between Prime Minister Modi and President Trump, he told reporters that Commerce Minister Piyush Goyal was supposed to go to Washington earlier but it did not materialise. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostIn Washington, a readout of the Modi-Trump meeting said, the two leaders discussed ways to broaden their strategic partnership and greatly increase trade between the United States and India. Though trade is an important part of the booming bilateral strategic partnership, a row over market access and tariffs has escalated in recent months, leading to fears of a protracted dispute. President Trump has previously described India as the “tariff king.” Before his meeting with Modi on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Osaka, Japan, demanded the withdrawal of India’s “very high” tariffs on US goods. “The Prime Minister spoke of the importance of energy imports from the US, and he referred to the fact that 4 billion dollars worth of imports are already in the pipeline and that would be expected to be stepped up,” Gokhale said. He noted that Prime Minister would be in the US in September to attend the UN General Assembly and would also travel to Houston, America’s energy capital. The prime minister is scheduled to address the Indian community in Houston on September 22. In Houston, the prime minister is expected to have a round table with the top CEOs of the energy companies in the US, he said. He said the objective there is two fold, one to see how India can import more energy (oil) from the US and second is how the country can invest in the energy sector in the US. Gokhale said President Trump spoke very warmly of the fact that India has become a major importer of energy. He also indicated that he was willing to send top administration officials to Houston in an effort to ensure that the bilateral energy relationship made progress. India’s exports to the US in 2017-18 stood at $47.9 billion, while imports were at $26.7 billion. The trade balance is in favour of India. The Foreign Secretary described the bilateral meeting between Modi and Trump as a very positive one. “This is the third either meeting or conversation that the two leaders have had in about 100 days of office that Prime Minister Modi has been in his second term,” he noted. In June, President Trump terminated India’s designation as a beneficiary developing nation under the key GSP trade programme after determining that New Delhi has not assured the US that it will provide “equitable and reasonable access” to its markets. The Generalized System of Preference (GSP) is the largest and oldest US trade preference programme and is designed to promote economic development by allowing duty-free entry for thousands of products from designated beneficiary countries. The Trump administration wants India to lower the trade barriers and embrace “fair and reciprocal” trade. Trump has also criticised India’s high import tariff on the iconic Harley- Davidson motorcycles as “unacceptable”. Many US companies like Google, Mastercard, Visa and Amazon have raised concerns over the issue of data localisation and its impact on their operational cost. In April last year, the Reserve Bank of India issued a directive on ‘Storage of Payment System Data’. It had advised all system providers to ensure that within a period of six months, the entire data relating to payment systems operated by them is stored in a system only in India, for effective monitoring. India has also dragged the US to the World Trade Organisation’s dispute settlement mechanism over the imposition of import duties on steel and aluminium.last_img read more

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Grilled Mexican Steak

first_imgIngredients Cumin Seeds1/2 cup Jalapeno Peppers (chopped)5 Garlic3 cloves Black Pepper (cracked)1 tbsp Fresh Lime Juice1/3 cup Salt1.5 tsp Olive Oil1.5 cup Cilantro (leaves and stems)2 bunches Flank Steak1 kg Preparation Toast the cumin seeds in a medium saute pan over medium-low heat for five minutes or until fragrant. In a blender, combine the cumin seeds, jalapenos, garlic, pepper, lime juice and salt. Pulse the blender to finely chop ingredients. Add the oil and cilantro, and puree until smooth. Also Read – PUMPKIN MASH, TAMATAR RASSALightly score both sides of the meat with a knife so that the marinade can penetrate. Place the meat in a large plastic bag or bowl, pour in the marinade, and coat well. Marinate in the refrigerator for 24 to 48 hours. Preheat an outdoor grill for high heat and lightly oil grate. Remove the meat from the marinade and discard the remaining marinade. Cook on high, 1 to 2 minutes per side, to sear the meat. Turn the heat down to low and cook for an additional 3 to 4 minutes per side, or until the it has reached the desired doneness. (Courtesy: www.allrecipes.com)last_img read more

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Saudi assures India of no oil supply shortage Oil Ministry

first_imgNew Delhi: India, the world’s third-largest oil consumer, will not be hit by a reduction in production at its No. 2 supplier Saudi Arabia, the Oil Ministry said on Monday. “Yesterday (September 15), Saudi Aramco officials informed the Indian refiners that there would be no shortage of supplies to them. Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas is closely monitoring the situation in consultation with Indian refiners and Saudi Aramco,” it said in a statement. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details A massive drone strike on the world’s largest crude-processing facility operated by Saudi Arabia’s Aramco has driven oil prices to their highest level in nearly four months. The attack has knocked out over half of Saudi Arabia’s production as it cut 5.7 million barrels per day or over 5 per cent of the world’s supply. India imports 83 per cent of its oil needs. Saudi Arabia is its second-biggest supplier after Iraq. It sold 40.33 million tonnes of crude oil to India in 2018-19 fiscal, when the country had imported 207.3 million tonnes of oil. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from Thursday Oil prices surged the most on record on Monday, with Brent crude rising by as much as 19.5 per cent to USD 71.95 per barrel – the biggest gain in dollar terms since futures started trading in 1988. US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) futures climbed 15.5 per cent to USD 63.34, the biggest intra-day percentage gain since June 1998. Officials at state-owned oil refiners said Saudi Aramco has informed that there would not be any major disruption, but has sought flexibility for switching to different grades for continuing supplies. Wood Mackenzie VP for Refining, Chemicals an Oil Markets, Alan Gelder said, “This attack has material implications for the oil market, as a loss of 5 million barrels per day of supplies from Saudi Arabia cannot be met for long by existing inventories and the limited spare capacity of the other OPEC+ group members. A geopolitical risk premium will return to the oil price.” Commenting on the situation, Kotak Institutional Equities said the largest-ever disruption of crude production in Saudi Arabia may keep oil prices elevated in the near term. “Global oil supplies may be adequately met through large inventories and strategic reserves; however, moderation in oil prices will depend on full restoration of Saudi’s production, which may at least take a few weeks,” it said, adding that any further escalation of geopolitical tensions in the Middle East region may add to the woes. Spike in crude prices, even if temporary, will be negative for Indian oil marketing companies and positive for upstream PSUs and GAIL, it said. “Any further escalation of geopolitical tensions in the Middle East region, which cannot be ruled out for now, may add to the woes of global oil supplies for now given lack of buffer from Saudi’s significant spare production capacity,” Kotak said. Crude supplies from Iran and Venezuela have already been curtailed significantly amid sanctions from the US, it added.last_img read more

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Montreal couple hoping city lets them keep beloved pet pig named Babe

first_imgMONTREAL – Babe the pig spends his days sleeping, going for walks on a leash or lounging around the Montreal condo he shares with his owners, their baby and three cats.His owners, Mario Ramos and Sara-Maude Ravenelle, say he’s clean, intelligent and affectionate.But now the couple is being faced with the prospect of giving up their family pet after a complaint from a neighbour led to a notice from the city that says micro pigs aren’t on the list of allowable pets.The notice stated they had 15 days to find a solution that complies with city rules or else face penalties.“I asked the agent if the complaint was about noise, and they said it wasn’t about noise or nuisance, just that there’s a pig living here,” Ramos said in an interview.Babe, for his part, appeared unconcerned with his fate Thursday, as he alternated between snoozing on a mattress, licking reporters’ shoes or lumbering down the hallway of the couple’s ground-floor condo in search of food.Ramos said the 27-kilogram porker is a “member of the family” who is affectionate toward the couple and their baby daughter, Rose-Elisabeth.“He sleeps most of the time, like a cat,” he said. “He’s very friendly with other animals and with kids.”Many large Canadian cities, including Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver, don’t allow pigs to be kept as pets.But Ramos says Montreal’s rules are unclear.He and his wife checked with their previous borough before bringing Babe home three years ago and were told pigs were allowed.But new city-wide animal control rules adopted in 2016 don’t mention pigs at all, either as permitted or banned.Ramos points out the city is working on a new animal control bylaw that will be presented by this summer, which he hopes will make allowance for his family’s porcine presence.Montreal Mayor Valerie Plante said Thursday the city has been in contact with the family and the Hochelaga-Maisonneuve borough mayor as it works to develop new rules.“We’re going to present our bylaw, but we’re going to find a solution, a compromise,” she told reporters.Other Canadian pig owners have gone to court to fight for the right to keep their pets.In 2015, an Alberta family had to part with a pot-bellied pig named Eli after a judge enforced a county bylaw that considered pigs as livestock.The director of animal advocacy at the Montreal SPCA says pigs are “affectionate and wonderful” but aren’t suited to be companion animals for most people because of their high needs.“They’re extremely intelligent, extremely demanding, and they certainly require much more time, energy or commitment than dogs and cats,” Alanna Devine said in a phone interview.She worries that allowing them as pets in the upcoming bylaw would lead to an explosion of irresponsible breeding and unprepared owners, eventually adding to the city’s problem of abandoned or unwanted animals.Instead, she hopes Montreal’s new bylaw will prohibit pigs but include a grandfather clause that will allow existing owners such as Ramos to keep their pets.last_img read more

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Six stories in the news today May 3

first_imgSix stories in the news for Wednesday, May 3———FORT MCMURRAY MARKS ONE YEAR SINCE ‘THE BEAST’Fort McMurray residents are marking a year since a ferocious wildfire swept into the northern Alberta city. A low-key, dawn-to-dusk event that includes yoga, dance, art and meditation is planned at a riverfront park. The fire nicknamed ‘the beast’ started deep in the bush on May 1 of last year and blew up two days later and forced the evacuation of the entire city.———HARJIT SAJJAN TO REVEAL ‘HOLE’ IN DEFENCE SPENDINGDefence Minister Harjit Sajjan is expected to set the stage today in an Ottawa speech for the Liberals’ much-anticipated defence policy by casting a light on what defence sources call a massive “hole” in military spending. The sources say that hole has resulted in little-to-no money for the replacement of aging equipment. Sajjan is not expected to reveal any details. That will have to wait for the actual defence policy.———SENATE ETHICS COMMITTEE CALLS FOR MEREDITH EXPULSIONThe Senate ethics committee has recommended that the upper house take the unprecedented step of expelling disgraced Sen. Don Meredith for engaging in a sexual relationship with a teenage girl. It’s now up to the full Senate, which has never before expelled a member, to decide whether to accept or reject the recommendation. A vote on Meredith’s fate can’t occur before next Tuesday at the earliest.———RENEWABLE ENERGY PRODUCTION SOARINGThe National Energy Board says two-thirds of Canada’s electricity supply now comes from renewable sources such as hydro and wind power. That places Canada fourth in production, behind China, the United States and Brazil. Hydroelectricity accounts for most renewable electricity, with 60 per cent of all electricity in Canada coming from hydro. Wind power is next at 4.4 per cent, then biomass power at 1.9 per cent and solar power at 0.5 per cent.———ONTARIO SEEKS ADVICE ON YOUTH RADICALIZATIONOntario’s minister of children and youth services says he believes young people can sometimes become radicalized when they don’t see a future. And, Michael Coteau says young people should know that there are many options open to them and that the government can offer support. To that end, the province is now seeking experts to conduct research and report back on youth radicalization and how to prevent it.———NEW POTASH MINE SET TO OPEN IN SASKATCHEWANThe first tonne of marketable potash is expected to be produced at the end of June from the first new mine in Saskatchewan in more than 40 years. After five years of construction, German fertilizer company K+S AG is opening the new mine near Bethune, about 70 kilometres north of Regina. The company said it expects to achieve its desired production capacity of two million tonnes by the end of this year. K+S is the world’s fifth largest producer of potash products.———ALSO IN THE NEWS TODAY:— Statistics Canada will release a batch of census data, including stats on age, sex and types of dwelling in Canada.— Closing arguments expected to start in trial of four men accused in fatal daytime shooting in Toronto’s Little Italy district in June 2012.— Companies reporting results today include Torstar, Loblaw Companies, Hudbay Minerals, Pengrowth Energy and Gildan Activewear.— Alberta auditor general Merwan Saher will table a report in the legislature.— Canada Post will unveil 10 commemorative stamps of significant moments, achievements or milestones from the past 50 years.last_img read more

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Mine fined 35M for spill that contaminated Alberta river system

first_imgHINTON, Alta. – A coal mining company has been handed a $3.5-million penalty for a 2013 spill from its tailings pond that fouled tributaries feeding the Athabasca River in Alberta.An estimated 670 million litres of waste water gushed out of a broken earth berm at the Obed Mountain mine near Hinton, Alta., on Oct. 31, 2013.The federal departments of Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada say Prairie Mines & Royalty ULC (formerly known as Coal Valley Resources) pleaded guilty Friday in Hinton provincial court to two counts of violating the Fisheries Act.About $1.15 million of the penalty is to be put into a trust to be managed by the University of Alberta to create a fish habitat and recovery research fund.The Environmental Damages Fund will be getting $2,150,000.last_img read more

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The Friday news briefing An ataglance survey of some top stories

first_imgHighlights from the news file for Friday, July 14———TRUDEAU TOUTS TRADE TO U.S. GOVERNORS: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told American governors at a meeting Friday in Rhode Island that Canada is by far America’s biggest trading partner. He added that if anything, Canada wants a thinner trading border, not a thicker one. And Trudeau noted Canada is a bigger customer than China, to the tune of $152 billion. Earlier, the Canadian government got what it wanted during the U.S. meetings — clear, public reassurances from American politicians that the North American Free Trade Agreement will be preserved. Vice-President Mike Pence promised a collaborative approach in a speech to the governors.———MAN GETS 4 YEARS IN DEATH OF MOUNTIE: A man was sentenced to four years in prison Friday for the death of an RCMP officer who was killed when a truck rammed her cruiser near Victoria last year. Kenneth Fenton, 29, has also been banned from driving and prohibited from owning a weapon for 10 years for the death of RCMP Const. Sarah Beckett. Provincial court Judge Ronald Lamperson said to his knowledge, it is the first case of drinking and driving causing the death of a police officer in British Columbia. Beckett, a 32-year-old mother of two boys, had recently returned from maternity leave when she was killed in Langford, a suburb of Victoria, in April 2016.———WOMAN SENTENCED FOR CONCEALING DEAD INFANTS: A Manitoba judge has sentenced a Winnipeg woman who hid the remains of six infants in a rented storage locker to 8 1/2 years. But with time served, the length goes down to seven years, eight months. Andrea Giesbrecht was found guilty earlier this year of storing the remains in plastic bins. Giesbrecht’s lawyer, Greg Brodsky, had asked that the case be tossed because it took more than two years to conclude. Judge Murray Thompson pointed out that Brodsky waited too long to request that.———WIND EXPECTED TO FAN B.C. WILDFIRES: Crews battling wildfires in British Columbia prepared for the worst Friday as officials predicted stronger winds over the weekend after a slight reprieve from the weather in recent days. Kevin Skrepnek, chief information officer for the BC Wildfire Service, says the forecast calls for sustained winds of 50 kilometres per hour. He says that will be a big challenge. About 180 wildfires were burning in central and southern B.C., including three around Williams Lake, where 11,000 people were on standby to leave their homes. Some rain was in the forecast for the area, but officials said showers would not be enough to douse active fires.———B.C. WILDFIRES RAISE LUMBER PRICES: The wildfires in the B.C. Interior that have forced some sawmills to halt operations have resulted in a boost in lumber prices at a time when forestry companies have been squeezed by softwood duties on exports to the U.S. By Friday, the benchmark price of Western spruce-pine-fir lumber rose 7.12 per cent to US$406 per thousand board feet from US$379 last Friday, according to figures from Random Lengths, which tracks lumber and panel prices. In the case of mills staying shut for months or even sustaining damage, it’s estimated prices could rise between 15 and 17 per cent.———DOWNIE FUND UNVEILS HALIFAX LEGACY ROOMS: Five Halifax businesses have responded to Tragically Hip rocker Gord Downie’s call on corporate Canada to do more to promote dialogue and reconciliation with Aboriginal people. The Legacy Room initiative, part of the Gord Downie and Chanie Wenjack Fund, announced the locations Friday including a Halifax private school, a university, an accounting firm, a restaurant and a development firm. Charlene Bearhead, co-chairwoman of the fund, says the spaces will encourage conversations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples and raise awareness of the legacy of residential schools.———CSIS FACES $35 MILLION LAWSUIT: Canada’s spy agency is facing questions about its workplace culture amid allegations that senior officials foster a prejudice and distrust for Muslims employees, who are seen as “essential to CSIS’ mission, but working without CSIS’ trust and respect.” The allegations are contained in a statement of claim filed Thursday in Federal Court by five employees who are seeking upwards of $35 million in damages for what they say was years of harassment condoned by supervisors. None of the allegations in the 54-page document have been tested in court.———ORGANIZERS CALL ON PROTESTERS TO TOPPLE STATUE: Organizers say a weekend protest calling for a statue of Halifax’s controversial founder to be toppled will proceed as planned, despite objections from some Mi’kmaq leaders. A Facebook event called “Removing Cornwallis” invites protesters to remove a large bronze statue of former governor Edward Cornwallis from atop a stone pedestal on Saturday. Members of the Nova Scotia Assembly of Mi’kmaq Chiefs agree that the statue should come down. However, they say protesters should use civic engagement, rather than force, to accomplish their goal.———PM OPENS OPENS SUPREME COURT TO NORTHERNERS: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has opened the process to choose the next Supreme Court justice and for the first time, candidates from the North are being specifically invited to apply. Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin is retiring this year, and tradition dictates her vacancy would be filled by a qualified judge or lawyer from one of Canada’s four western provinces, as she is from B.C. But in a statement Friday, Trudeau says the North is now being acknowledged in that tradition and so candidates from there and the West will be eligible for the post. The Northwest Territories, Yukon and Nunavut do not have a representative on the court.———WOMEN IN SHELTERS MAY BE MISSING BENEFITS: Canada’s taxpayers’ advocate says the Canada Revenue Agency isn’t doing a good enough job ensuring women living in shelters with their children are aware of and receiving benefit cheques. Taxpayers’ ombudsman Sherra Profit launched a systemic examination Friday to study what kind of effort the CRA has made to reach out to shelters regarding benefits such as the Canada Child Benefit or the working income tax benefit. Profit said she has received several complaints from shelters about the lack of information from the CRA.———last_img read more

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Fire that killed three people in Nanaimo BC ruled accidental

first_imgNANAIMO, B.C. – The cause of a house fire that killed a family of three in Nanaimo, B.C., has been ruled accidental.An investigation by Nanaimo Fire and Rescue suggests the most likely cause of the fire was unattended candles.Fire Chief Karen Fry says the fire was tragic and their thoughts are with the family and friends of the three people who lost their lives.Fire crews were called to a home on Tuesday afternoon when a passerby noticed flames and tried to alert anyone inside.The bodies of a man, woman and their seven-year-old daughter were later found inside.Police had originally said the fire was being treated as suspicious because they didn’t know the origin of the blaze.last_img read more

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Ellard gets conditional day parole while serving sentence in Reena Virk killing

first_imgABBOTSFORD, B.C. – Two decades after 14-year-old Reena Virk was savagely beaten and drowned near a bridge in the Victoria area, her killer has been granted conditional approval for day parole.Kelly Ellard, 35, wiped away tears on Thursday as a two-member panel granted her day parole for six months. She’ll first have to complete a residential treatment program for substance abuse during that term.Panel member Colleen Zuk said Ellard was largely responsible for Virk’s death in a crime she described as “heinous.”“It’s very problematic in your case that there have been years and years of deception, of lying about the facts,” Zuk said. “Today we found that you continued to somewhat minimize.”However, she said she found Ellard to be more transparent than in the past, including admitting she planned to harm Virk and saying she wanted to “get rid of her” after the beating.Zuk said it helped that Ellard has done trauma counselling and had the support of her parole officer, who said her last substance abuse issue was in June 2015 and she has not been violent in a decade.Before the decision, Ellard said there was nothing Virk could have possibly said or done to deserve what happened to her.“It wasn’t about her,” she said. “She should have been at home with her family who loved her, not out with us that night, and I’m very sorry.”After six months, the parole board will review the decision. Ellard will be subject to conditions including that she not use drugs or alcohol or contact anyone involved in crime or Virk’s family.Ellard has served about 15 years in prison, having spent some periods out on bail. She was convicted of second-degree murder in 2005 after three trials and is serving a life sentence.Mukand Pallan, Virk’s grandfather, said the family has been waiting for an apology for 20 years.“If she has admitted fully her guilt, and she has said sorry, I don’t think there’s anything else we can ask for. And if she’s just playing games like she’s been doing for the last 20 years, it won’t satisfy us,” he said.“Still, she has to admit fully that she’s responsible for it and she killed Reena. And she should say ‘I’m sorry for that.’ “A court heard Ellard, then 15, and several other teens swarmed and beat Virk before Ellard and a teenage boy followed her across the bridge, smashed her head into a tree and held her underwater until she drowned.Warren Glowatski was also convicted of second-degree murder and granted full parole in 2010.Ellard has recently assumed more responsibility for her part in the murder, saying she rolled Virk’s unconscious body into the Gorge waterway.But she continued to deny holding the girl’s head underwater on Thursday.“I am adamant that didn’t happen,” she told the panel. “Someone who had been beaten that badly, you wouldn’t need to hold them under water.”The panel pressed her to explain why she pushed Virk’s body into the water. Ellard replied that she was terrified the girl would call police.“I had never seen anything like that,” Ellard said, breaking down in tears. “Either she was dead or she was dying. I just wanted to get rid of her.”When asked who was responsible for Virk’s death, she replied, “I am.”Ellard first applied for day parole in 2016 and was denied. But in February she was granted temporary escorted absences to go to parenting programs and doctors’ appointments with her infant son.She became pregnant last year after having conjugal visits with her boyfriend, who is also in prison and is scheduled to return to the community soon. The baby lives with Ellard in prison.Ellard said she has suffered from anxiety her entire life and it was especially acute when she first went out on escorted absences.“When I was first going out and someone looked at me, (I thought) they’re judging me and I have a sign flashing above my head that I’m a monster,” she said.But Ellard said she turned her attention to her son and thought about how lucky she was to have him.She said she intends to co-parent with her boyfriend but if he commits a crime or uses drugs, she’s prepared to leave.“As much as I love him, if I had to let go … for the sake of myself and my child, I would.”— With files from Gemma Karstens-Smith in Vancouver.last_img read more

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U of T drops international fees for most PhD scholars

first_imgTORONTO – The University of Toronto is stepping up efforts to lure top global scholars by slashing tuition fees for most international PhD students.Starting this fall, the university says most international PhD students will be charged the same amount as domestic students.The difference is huge — the 2017/18 fall-winter session cost international students at the downtown campus $23,692.14, plus ancillary fees, which vary by course.Meanwhile, domestic students were charged $8,480.14, plus ancillary fees.Graduate studies dean Joshua Barker says it’s part of a bid to “remove any barriers, financial or otherwise, that graduate students might face as they look to attend our university.”The change affects students in all years of a PhD program, but excludes those in doctoral stream master’s programs.In the 2017/18 academic year, 1,179 of the school’s 6,145 PhD students were international students.Global interest in Canadian universities appears to be strong.The U of T says applications from international undergraduate students have increased by 35 per cent compared to this time last year.That includes “major increases” in students from the United States, India, and the Middle East, says the school.In 2017, acceptances from the U.S. increased by 66 per cent, and by 47 per cent for students from India.But despite a spike in the number of applications, the number of international students has stayed at between 20 and 25 per cent of the total student population.University spokeswoman Althea Blackburn-Evans says there are no plans to increase that ratio.Many observers trace the spike in foreign interest to the U.S. presidential election in 2016, and so far Donald Trump has made good on promises to tighten travel restrictions and increase deportations.Last year, the U of T said applications from U.S. students were up almost 80 per cent compared to the same period a year earlier.Meanwhile, U.S. media outlets reported a decline in applications at U.S. schools from places including India and the Middle East.Advanced Education Minister Mitzie Hunter says the move can only strengthen Ontario’s position as a place to foster innovation and attract global players such as Amazon, which is currently considering Toronto as the location for its second headquarters.“We’ve always been a very attractive place for students,” says Hunter.“One of the strengths that we have in Ontario is our diversity and having international students here studying with our students makes it a much richer conversation and really probably strengthens the thinking as ideas are being shared and explored.”— With files from Shawn Jeffordslast_img read more

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UBC president apologizes for failing to confront over residential schools

first_imgVANCOUVER – The president of the University of British Columbia opened the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre on Monday with an apology to survivors for the school’s role in perpetuating a harmful system.Santa Ono said universities bear part of the responsibility for the history because they trained many of the policy makers who administered the schools and tacitly accepted the silence surrounding them.Ono said failing to confront a heinous piece of history, even if the university didn’t cause it, would mean becoming complicit in the ongoing harm.“That is why, today, on behalf of the UBC community, I apologize to you who were so affected by that system, for our participation in a system that has oppressed you, excluded you and that, through intention or inaction, continues to cause offence,” he said in a statement.Ono said few Canadians are aware of the history of the residential school system or its lasting harmful effects. That ignorance is no accident, he added.“Expressions of Aboriginal culture were banned by Canadian law from 1885 to 1951, and only recently has significant attention been given to Aboriginal history, experience, and perspectives in school curricula at any education level,” he said.The dialogue centre that was officially opened is intended to educate the public about the devastating impact of the residential school system.Cindy Tom-Lindley, a former resident school student and executive director of the Indian Residential School Survivor Society, said in a release that teaching and learning about Canada’s past is the responsibility of all, not just First Nations.“It is my hope that people take advantage of this centre and education themselves so that we can all have a better understanding and help create a brighter future for generations to come.”First Nations Summit Grand Chief Edward John said the centre will be an important reminder for Canadians, and a valuable path to reconciliation for residential school survivors.Ono said nearly every Indigenous family in Canada has been affected by the schools, and the effects on communities continue to this day.“Those who survived often left feeling distraught, alienated and angry,” he said. “With no or limited experience of family life, and no means to address the trauma they had experienced, many transmitted the abuse they had endured to later generations.”The two-storey centre was funded by $5.5 million in donations.last_img read more

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Tropical storm Chris to track south of Nova Scotia make Newfoundland landfall

first_imgHALIFAX – Tropical storm Chris is expected to swing south of Nova Scotia at hurricane strength later this week before making landfall in Newfoundland as a “very strong” post-tropical storm, a meteorologist warned Tuesday.Environment Canada meteorologist Ian Hubbard said the storm was off the coast of Carolina on Tuesday and was expected to intensify as it started moving northeast later in the day.The storm was expected to track south of Nova Scotia at hurricane strength on Thursday, but Hubbard said it was too early to determine if wind or rainfall warnings would be required for Nova Scotia or southeastern Newfoundland, where a Friday arrival is in the forecast.“As it tracks towards Newfoundland, it will diminish from a hurricane to a post-tropical storm, but it will still be very strong, and it will still be a significant storm at that point,” Hubbard said in an interview from Halifax.Given the storm’s predicted track, the strongest winds were expected to be over Newfoundland’s Avalon Peninsula. Southern coastlines of that region could also expect storm surges.“Eastern Newfoundland, specifically the Avalon Peninsula, seems to be the area we’re going to pay a lot of attention to over the next couple of days with the forecast,” said Hubbard.Hubbard said the storm’s track amounted to good news for people in Nova Scotia, but some eastern areas of the province could still expect some rain.“There could also be some decent waves along the Atlantic coast, with wave heights as high as four metres for Cape Breton,” Hubbard said.Meanwhile, Environment Canada issued an air quality advisory Tuesday for the Fredericton area due to smoke from forest fires in New Brunswick. High levels of air pollution were expected to develop in the provincial capital and Southern York County.A heat advisory also remained in effect for much of New Brunswick and northern Nova Scotia, where temperatures were expected to reach as high as 33 C in some areas.last_img read more

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Veterinarian warns dog owners on cannabis risks saying cases come in weekly

first_imgST. JOHN’S, N.L. – A veterinarian is warning dog owners to be careful with cannabis, saying her clinic is treating about one dog per week for marijuana toxicity.Dr. Maggie Brown-Bury said it’s become common to see multiple dogs at her St. John’s clinic for cannabis toxicity at one time — it treated three dogs last week alone.“We are going to keep seeing an increase in those cases until people get educated,” said Brown-Bury, whose Veterinary Specialty Centre of Newfoundland and Labrador doesn’t track the precise number of such cases.“There’s not usually any long-term effects to the dog from marijuana toxicity, they’d have to take in a pretty large amount […] but the symptoms are quite alarming if you’re not sure what you’re looking at.”The cases often involve the dog consuming a cannabis product at home, or picking up a discarded joint or other tetrahydrocannabinol-rich (THC) product in a public space.Dogs are especially sensitive to THC, with signs of toxicity including a low heart rate, dribbling urine, difficulty walking, vomiting, and exaggerated response to stimulus.Brown-Bury said some patients are open about the fact that their dog consumed a product at home, but it can be more difficult to trace the symptoms when consumption takes place in public.The impact varies based on the size of the dog — a small dog could become ill from consuming just the discarded end of a joint — but even larger animals are at risk if they come across a sizable portion.Lori Savory and her husband had a serious scare last Saturday night, when their 55-pound husky Aspen fell sick at a busy St. John’s park near their home.After noticing Aspen vomiting and lying down on the ground during her walk, the couple rushed the dog to vet, where they were told she likely consumed an edible cannabis product on the field.Savory said Aspen’s condition has improved dramatically, but the $1,000 visit to the vet was a wake-up call.“At the point where my husband put her into the car, she was so limp and non-responsive he didn’t even know whether she was still alive or not,” said Savory.Brown-Bury said cases like Aspen’s, where the product was consumed outside the home, can make tracking the number of incidents difficult, but the unique symptoms can be compared to previous cases to make an informed treatment decision.“We can never ask the dog any questions, so that always makes it a bit challenging,” said Brown-Bury. “They’ll pick up just about anything and we’re seeing effects.”As October’s legalization date approaches, Brown-Bury said she hopes pet owners will become more aware of the symptoms of cannabis toxicity in dogs, and that cannabis users will be conscious of the risks to dogs and small children when in shared public spaces.“Not passing judgement on what people are doing with their spare time, but you’ve got to be aware that other people are using that space with dogs or with small children who might not have the sense to recognize the danger,” said Brown-Bury.In Colorado, where recreational marijuana was legalized in 2012, there was a four-fold increase in reported cases of toxicity in dogs between 2010 and 2015.Brown-Bury said death is very rare, and she personally has not treated a case that severe.Medicinal cannabis products that have high cannabidiol (CBD) levels are used to treat health problems in humans, but the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association has not approved any cannabis products for medicinal use on animals.Brown-Bury said there’s little research around the impact of CBD on animals, which makes it difficult to give informed advice to pet owners looking to treat their dogs with medicinal cannabis.Almost a week after the park incident, Savory said Aspen is back to her usual hyper self, and back to “aggravating her older sister,” but she hopes Aspen’s story encourages people to be more careful with their cannabis use.“We’re expecting her to be good as new, but as I said, scary stuff. Very scary.”last_img read more

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Vigil to be held in Calgary to remember victims of Pittsburgh attack

first_imgCALGARY (660 NEWS) – The Calgary Jewish Federation is holding a community-wide vigil to remember the victims of the horrific Pittsburgh attack.Eleven people were killed on Saturday when a gunman opened fire inside a synagogue.Tuesday night, Jewish organizations and many faiths will come together in a show of solidarity against anti-Semitism.The vigil starts at 7:00 p.m. at the Beth Tzedec Synagogue on Glenmore Trail.Earlier this week, the federation released a statement on the massacre.“Together we mourn the murder of Jews, murdered simply for being Jews…this hateful and senseless act has taken lives of innocent congregants and injured others, including members of the local Pittsburgh law enforcement community. Though thousands of miles away, we stand shoulder to shoulder with our brothers and sisters at The Tree of Life Congregation, in both sadness and resolve. Our community will remain strong in the face of such hateful acts.”The apparent gunman, Robert Bowers, has been released from a local hospital and faces dozens of federal and state charges.last_img read more

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Somali refugee takes amazing road from refugee camps to Victoria city council

first_imgDirk Meissner, The Canadian Press VICTORIA — It was one of the happiest days of his life, but Sharmarke Dubow says he was paralyzed with emotion the day he was sworn in as a member of Victoria city council.Dubow said he couldn’t smile and his words were a barely audible mumble as he reflected back on his journey from Somalia’s civil war to a refugee camp in Kenya and finally to Victoria City Hall. Now, Dubow, 35, who was born on Christmas Day, can’t stop smiling or talking.He became a Canadian citizen on July 1, 2017, Canada’s 150th anniversary, and was elected to city council in November. It was the first time he’d voted, anywhere.“I was holding myself to cry,” he said in a recent interview. “The reason why I was not smiling is there were so many emotions. I could not believe to be the voice for people in Victoria and to represent them.”Dubow is six-foot-four and thinly built. He smiles broadly and laughs joyously as he retraces his journey from a refugee camp to city council at a downtown coffee shop.He gets up to hug people who offer him their best wishes and gushes about meeting Canadian figure skating icons Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir earlier in the day at a Salvation Army Christmas fundraising event.“Tessa told me I should write a book,” said Dubow.He said Canada gave him a home and his election to council gives him the chance to give back.“When I became a Canadian citizen I felt I have a home, I have rights and responsibilities,” said Dubow. “It was all about me having a second chance at life, belonging to a country and being a proud Canadian. But when I’m elected, it’s not about me. It’s holding a huge responsibility and knowing I have a huge curve of learning.”He was eight years old when his mother put him and his sister on a boat fleeing strife in Somalia. Dubow said they crossed the Indian Ocean by moonlight and landed at Mombasa, Kenya, where he lived in a tent and camp for five years with hundreds of others.“I remember my mother putting two jackets, two trousers in a case and telling me to hold my sister’s hand. I remember looking back at my mother,” said Dubow, whose mother was able to join them in the camp after a later boat voyage.Dubow said he built a bed of bamboo sticks and recalled camp life being one of daily struggles and of frightened people looking for their next meal and trying to make a living. He said the United Nations stepped in to ensure the camp was permitted to exist.Dubow said his life as a refugee and stateless person influenced him to become an advocate for human rights across Africa and ultimately brought him to Canada where he took a job at the Victoria Immigrant and Refugee Centre Society.“In Kenya, I was in a camp. In Ethiopia I was undocumented, meaning I was not registered under the United Nations Human Rights Commission or the Ethiopian government,” he said. “In Egypt I was a refugee. I wasn’t in a camp but I was a refugee under the UN HRC. They never gave me a chance to become a citizen and be part of the society.”Dubow said he was an outsider without rights, until he came to Canada in 2012.“Canada gave me that chance,” he said. “Victoria lifted me up. People have lifted me up and given me that chance.”Dubow said Canada gave him a safe home after 20 years of being homeless.“We have a system that works, that will protect my rights regardless of my sexuality, my race, my background,” he said. “I am able to sleep and not worry about bullets coming through my wall.”Dubow said it may sound like a contradiction, but despite having spent much of his young life in a refugee camp, one of his favourite things to do in Canada is pitch a tent and sit around a campfire.“Living in Canada, and camping for leisure, for a date, it’s a different lifestyle brother,” he said. “When you wake up, all the grass is high and it reflects the sun, and sometimes I don’t want it to, but it takes me back and reminds me of who I am.”Dubow said he is still a newcomer to the workings of municipal politics. After years of challenging governments on refugee issues, he wants to use his new position as an elected councillor to give back and bring people together.“The best way is having tea and sitting with people from all walks of life.”last_img read more

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Play until you cant Bronco focuses on sledge hockey instead of anniversary

first_imgOKOTOKS — At the end of a long and difficult year, Ryan Straschnitzki is on the ice and his hockey dream is intact.Straschnitzki and his Humboldt Broncos teammates were on their way to a Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League playoff game last April when tragedy struck.A semi-trailer drove through a stop sign and into the path of their bus at an intersection. Sixteen people died and 13 others, including Ryan, had their lives changed forever.Straschnitzki, paralyzed from the chest down, had hoped to play university hockey or, if fortune favoured him, make it to the National Hockey League. Now his entire focus is on playing for Canada on the national sledge hockey team.The 19-year-old from Airdrie, Alta., was on the ice late Wednesday night in Okotoks, south of Calgary, for an intense one-on-one mentoring session with his coach and former national sledge team member Chris Cederstrand. A handful of more experienced players darted around him.Ninety minutes later, practice was over and Straschnitzki, soaked in sweat, was the last person to come off the ice.“It’s a lot better, eh?” he asked.“There’s still a lot of practice to do. Chris is teaching a bunch of tips and tricks to kind of manoeuvre around my disability in the sled because I don’t have a core. I attempt it. He corrects me, and I just keep trying it.”Straschnitzki says he won’t be attending the sentencing Friday in Melfort, Sask., for the truck driver who caused the deadly crash. He’ll be returning to the Shriners Hospital for Sick Children in Philadelphia for a medical checkup.But the sentencing and the crash anniversary are still on his mind.“It’s hard not to think about it but I try my best,” he said.“I text my buddies to make sure they’re doing OK. We just keep in touch and are there for each other.”Cederstrand said he’s rarely seen anyone as committed to the sport as Straschnitzki and, if the hard work continues, there’s no reason why he can’t achieve his new dream.“For him to have that kind of ambition so soon after everything happened … it’s something I’ve never encountered before and he’s just unrelenting on the ice,” Cederstrand said.“His hockey IQ is way above already and … I have no question that as things progress forward, our goal is the Olympics in 2026.”Straschnitzki said he just wants to continue playing hockey.“I want to play as long as I can play, just like any Canadian guy or girl. You want to play until you can’t.” — Follow @BillGraveland on TwitterBill Graveland, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Police to crack down on Mafia after mans slaying in crowded Quebec

first_imgMONTREAL — A Quebec police force is cracking down on organized crime after this month’s brazen organized crime-linked slaying inside a popular hotel.Laval police say they, along with Quebec provincial police and the RCMP, will be stepping up presence at establishments known to be frequented by organized crime groups on their territory.Pierre Brochet, Laval’s police chief, says the May 5 slaying of Salvatore Scoppa, which took place with hundreds of people present and with a blatant disregard for their safety, harkens back to Quebec’s biker gang wars in the 1990s.Scoppa, 49, a man with links to organized crime, was declared dead in hospital. Remarkably, no one else was injured in the attack.Brochet says “Projet Repercussion” is in response to that event, which he called unacceptable.Scoppa’s was one of two fatal shootings in crowded public places in the span of a week.On Friday night, a 25-year-old man was killed in a restaurant in busy shopping district in Brossard, Que., just south of Montreal.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Recipe collection offers insight into 18th century life in the Maritimes

first_imgFREDERICTON — You’re not going to find the latest recipe for avocado toast, but a new collection of recipes is offering an insight into early colonial life in the Maritimes, including advice for making your own medicine, desserts, and even how to catch a rat.Edith Snook, an English professor at the University of New Brunswick, says recipes helped the early settlers to figure out how to live.Snook and Lyn Bennett, an associate professor of English at Dalhousie University, and a team of research assistants have spent the last three years digging through archives to find recipes written in the Maritimes before 1800.The team found over 500 recipes in newspapers and hand-written documents.Snook says they’ve compiled the information in a searchable database.She says the recipes range from helpful remedies and baked goods to fertilizers, and what appears to be an early version of Jell-O rum shooters.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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